Carter's Pro-Shop
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732-797-1001 or 1-866-871-2695
Email: CartersPro@aol.com

How to Shop for a New Bowling Ball
(Ebonite International)

"Bring along an old ball and be prepared to ask and answer a few important questions."

     Are you in the market for a new bowling ball? If so, there are two important things to think about when you visit your local pro shop.
     First, having a basic understanding of the different types of bowling balls on the market today can help you sort through the maze of choices.
     Second, there are a few questions you should ask - and a few questions you should be prepared to answer - when you make your visit.
     Veteran pro shop professionals Bill Calhoon, Frankie May Jr. and Carol Norman, who annually drill thousands of new balls for Ebonite, Hammer and Storm at the USBC Championships Tournament, offer the following tips:

     *****BRING AN OLD BALL WITH YOU !!!
     All three agree this is perhaps the most important thing you can do to help your ball driller. Calhoon said he can match up your new ball so it fits the same as the old ball (assuming you like your current grip), but reacts differently (assuming you want a ball that expands your ability to play the lanes differently than your existing ball).
     "Your old ball can give the pro shop operator a lot of information to work with, including the fact that it might not fit right," Norman noted. "Proper fitting is often overlooked when a customer wants a new ball. And you may not realize your old ball fits poorly simply because you've had it for a long time and you're used to how it feels."

     *****DON'T CLEAN YOUR OLD BALL !!!
     Bring that favorite old ball complete with oil rings, dirt, taped gripping holes and all. If you clean your ball, it's harder for the pro to get a good read on how you throw it. Calhoon said he can tell a lot just by examining the oil rings and wear track.

     *****DID YOUR HAND CHANGE?
     Your hand size changes as you age, so if you haven't been measured for a proper fit in the past few years, let your ball driller know. Your span might change, but for older bowlers, a change in finger and thumb pitches may be important.
     "As a bowler gets up in years, thumb pitch should change to help you hold onto the ball better," May said. "Also, your fingers don't bend as much as they did when you were younger. These are things you should periodically adjust."

     *****HOW FAST DO YOU THROW THE BALL?
     Although a precise radar reading on your normal ball speed isn't crucial, it can be a big help. If nothing else, rate yourself compared to those you normally bowl with. Do you throw the ball quite a bit harder, a little faster, slower or about the same? If you have a center in your area with on of the scoring systems that will measure ball speed, that's also an option for getting a more precise read on ball speed.

     *****BE OPEN MINDED
     Calhoon said he has the easiest time matching up bowlers with a new ball when they don't know exactly what they want. Having an open mind helps the ball driller set you up with the best ball to fit your game.
     Experienced ball drillers also can often tell, simply by looking at calluses, cuts or blisters on your hand and the way you put your hand into your equipment, whether or not you may need to change your grip.
     "I can often tell if a bowler tends to drop the ball a lot by looking at the pitches, span and hole sizes," Calhoon said. "I can't say I know everything, but I have seen just about everything."

     *****HAVE YOUR ARSENAL EXAMINED
     Doing a complete "arsenal check" is a great idea before you punch holes in a new ball, May said.
     "The thing we hate most is to open a bowler's bag and see three or four balls with the exact same drilling layout. The only thing the bowler has achieved by shining or sanding the surfaces is to get earlier or later roll," May said.
     "If you want to expand your arsenal, we recommend three different layouts - control, arc and strong - so each ball will respond to different types of lane conditions without the bowler having to change technique in order to make the ball do something different."
     "Knowing when to throw each ball is very important," May added. "The control layout is most often used on freshly conditioned lanes. As oil moves and lane conditions change, the arc or strong drilling patterns will work much better."

     *****DO YOU REALLY NEED A NEW BALL?
     "The bowling ball isn't the ultimate answer," Norman noted. "Some bowlers think a new ball will solve their problems, but investing in a good lesson may do them more good."
     "You have to develop trust with your pro shop pro in matching up your skills and your bowling needs. That's really the perfect fit."
"BUYER BEWARE"
   Negative impact upon the bowling industry of the so called drilling services provided by some discount retailers. The real disaster for the industry at large is that the pro-shop is stripped of the opportunity to provide expertise, professional drilling & fitting services, consumer education and first quality products.
   The new bowler (generally a youngster or senior citizen) are both concerned with getting a new ball in their hands at the least dollar value. Children are concerned because it is their parents money and seniors are concerned because of the need to conserve their limited dollars. This practice does, however, have a disastrous and logical result.
   Through observations of their (discount retailers) drilling operations and practices, they are definitely attracting and affecting the first time bowler. Unfortunately, they are doing it with inept fitting and drilling practices.
   A true pro-shop professional spends exorbitant amounts of time, effort and money on the education process to hone their skills and knowledge in ball fitting and drilling; on the study of the human anatomy, specifically the hand and inter-related muscles and tendons; on seminars and training classes; on experimentation and research that sometimes necessitates the trial & error system.
   Just think. The under-trained and inexperienced discount store stocker refer to themselves as professional ball drillers, and these stores’ advertising suggests that their products are professionally drilled. Developing the “optimum” pro-shop professional with a 40 minute video and a skimpy training manual just doesn’t cut it. “Choose a ball that suits your game; Choose a professional for fitting and drilling services.”
   Yes, people look for things when we spend money: the finest quality, the best service and, of course, the lowest investment. Unfortunately, no company can offer all three. For long-term happiness, which should the beginner bowler be willing to give up? Fine Quality? Excellent service? Or the lowest fee?
    Poor quality and crappy service are okay as long as they’re cheap. “I can get it cheaper somewhere else.” Have you ever heard this before? And, have you ever heard, “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.”-Pro-Shop Today (Newspaper)
Choosing The Right Bowling Equipment 
How to Choose a Bowling Ball
Bowling Ball History
Advanced
GUIDE TO PROPER BALL SELECTION:

BALL SPEED
Slower: Higher RG cores, lower differential cores, 
  pearl veneers, reduced friction veneers
  (may have to polish the surface if it is sanded)
Faster: Lower RG cores, higher differential cores, 
  aggressive veneers (may have to sand the surface
  if it is too shiny)

AXIS ROTATION
Minimal Side Roll: Higher RG cores, pearls, 
  reduced friction veneers
Maximum Side Roll: Lower RG cores, lower 
  differential cores

AXIS TILT
More Spin: Lower RG cores, higher differential 
  cores, aggressive veneers (you may have to sand
  the surface to control the violence of the 
  breakpoint and to get the ball into an earlier roll)
No Spin: Any cores, any veneers, match up to lane
  condition, revs, ball speed, axis rotation

REVOLUTIONS
Power Player: Lower differential cores, pearls, 
  medium/high RG cores
Stroker: Higher differential cores

AMOUNT OF OIL
Oily: Lower RG cores, higher differential cores, 
  aggressive veneers (you may have to sand the 
  surface to create an earlier roll)
Drier: Higher RG cores, lower differential cores, 
  pearls, reduced friction veneers (you may have to
  polish the surface to delay the breakpoint)

BACKEND CONDITION
Carrydown: Higher differential cores
Fresh: Lower differential cores 

The above categories are meant as a guide to select the correct ball for you. Ball speed, axis rotation, axis tilt, revolutions, and lane conditions are all important criteria to consider when choosing the correct ball for you. 

Radius of Gyration:
Low RG:
* Low RG balls have less resistance to change in
  motion. (hook transition quicker)
* More adept in heavy oil.
* Spinner releases, side roll releases, faster ball 
  speeds
Medium RG:
* More length than low RG balls.
* More friction needed for this core to go into hook
  transition.
* Medium RG balls fit most lane conditions and 
  bowler styles.
High RG:
* Most resistance to change in motion.
* Most friction needed to go into hook transition.
* Best when used on drier lanes, heads are broken
  down.
* Require surface friction to react well in oil.
* Backend hook is more angular than the low RG 
  balls.
* Slower ball speeds, less side roll.

Differential (flare potential):
Higher Differential:
* Less revolutions, faster ball speeds, longer oil
  patterns, oil carry down
Lower Differential:
* Dry, over-reacting lanes.

Radius of Gyration:
  Low RG:
    * Low RG balls have less resistance to change in motion. (hook transition quicker)
    * More adept in heavy oil.
    * Spinner releases, side roll releases, faster ball speeds
  Medium RG:
    * More length than low RG balls.
    * More friction needed for this core to go into hook transition.
    * Medium RG balls fit most lane conditions and bowler styles.
  High RG:
    * Most resistance to change in motion.
    * Most friction needed to go into hook transition.
    * Best when used on drier lanes, heads are broken down.
    * Require surface friction to react well in oil.
    * Backend hook is more angular than the low RG balls.
    * Slower ball speeds, less side roll.

Differential (flare potential):
  Higher Differential:
    * Less revolutions, faster ball speeds, longer oil patterns, oil carry down
  Lower Differential:
    * Dry, over-reacting lanes.

GUIDE TO PROPER BALL SELECTION:
  Ball speed, what to l look for: 
    * Slower: Higher RG cores, lower differential cores, pearl veneers, reduced friction veneers
      (may have to polish the surface if it is sanded)

    * Faster: Lower RG cores, higher differential cores, aggressive veneers
      (may have to sand the surface if it is too shiny)

  Axis Rotation:
    * Minimal Side Roll: Higher RG cores, pearls, reduced friction veneers
    * Maximum Side Roll: Lower RG cores, lower differential cores

  Axis Tilt:
    * More Spin: Lower RG cores, higher differential cores, aggressive veneers
      (you may have to sand the surface to control the violence of the breakpoint and to get
      the ball into an earlier roll)
    * No Spin: Any cores, any veneers, match up to lane condition, revs, ball speed, axis rotation

  Revolution:
   * Power Player: Lower differential cores, pearls, medium/high RG cores

   * Stroker: Higher differential cores

  Amount of Oil:
    * Oily: Lower RG cores, higher differential cores, aggressive veneers
              (you may have to sand the surface to create an earlier roll)

   * Drier: Higher RG cores, lower differential cores, pearls, reduced friction veneers
               (you may have to polish the surface to delay the breakpoint)

  Backend conditions:
    * Carrydown: Higher differential cores

   * Fresh: Lower differential cores

 The above categories are meant as a guide to select the correct ball for you. Ball speed, axis
 rotation, axis tilt, revolutions, and lane conditions are all important criteria to consider when
 choosing the correct ball for you. 
Advanced Guides & Glossaryof Terms
Going Pro with Chuck on the Truck
Lane Side Reviews 
Selecting the Proper Ball (Part 1)
Introduction
Selecting the Proper Ball (Part 2)
What type of bowler are you?
Selecting the Proper Ball (Part 3)
Beginning Bowler & Grip
Selecting the Proper Ball (Part 4)
League Bowler & Grip
Selecting the Proper Ball (Part 5)
​Tournament Bowler
Selecting the Proper Ball (Part 6)
Maintain your Investment & Conclusion
Glossary

All information provided by Storm Bowling Products

 Ambient Temperature - Temperature of the surrounding area; same as room temperature.
Approach - The area immediately in front of the lane before the foul line measuring at least 15 feet in length and not
   less than the width of the lane.
Approved- Used to describe equipment that has been sent in, reviewed, tested and found to meet all current
   specifications at the time of approval.
ASQ- American Society for Quality.
ASTM- American Society of Testing Materials.
Asymmetrical Core (undrilled)- A ball where the RG (radius of gyration) values of the Y (high RG) and Z (intermediate
   RG) axes of the ball differ by more than 5% of the total differential of the ball.
Axis migration- Path of which the axis point travels across the surface of a ball as the ball travels down the lane; this
   path will always have the approximate same RG measurement as the ball travels.
Axis Point - One of two points located on opposite poles marking the end points of the axis of rotation.
Axis of Rotation - An imaginary line, perpendicular to the track, along which a bowling ball rotates.
Axis tilt - The measurement of the vertical angle through which a ball rotates; tilt is synonymous with the amount of
   “spin” a bowler has.
Back End - The angle or degree of hook at the breakpoint. Back End is not where the ball hooks, but how much it
   hooks when it hooks.
Balance Hole - An extra hole drilled in a specifc position in the bowling ball. This hole is used to balance the ball
   statically and alter the overall reaction of the bowling ball.
Ball Speed
  Slower - initial velocity is less than 17mph
  Medium - initial velocity is between 17mph and 19mph
  Faster - initial velocity is greater than 19mph

There is a formula to calculate a player's velocity:
  1. Determine the elapsed time (in seconds, i.e. 2.52) from the moment of the player's release to the moment of
      impact on the pins.
  2. Divide this number into 40.91 (i.e. 40.91/2.52 = 16.23 mph).

Ball Track - The portion of the bowling ball, which comes in contact with the lane as it rolls down the lane.
Bifilar - The use of two cords or wires to support the test cradle in testing the radius of gyration of a bowling pin. 
Break Point - The portion of the lane where the bowling ball completes its transition from skid to traction, and provides
   the greatest amount of hook. This generally occurs in the last 20 to 25 feet of the lane.
Carry-down - Refers to the oil that travels to the previously-dry backends. This condition results in less overall hook.
Center of Gravity (CG) - The position in which the ball is evenly balanced statically in all directions. This is usually
   indicated by the position of the logo or punch mark.
Certified - Any competition, bowler, league, center or coach that is registered with USBC.
Coefficient of friction, COF - The ratio of the force opposing the relative motion of two surfaces and the normal force
   acting perpendicular opposing force. In bowling, this term usually defines the interaction between the coverstock,
   lane conditioner and lane.
Coefficient of restitution, COR - The ratio of the energy of two objects after impact to the energy before impact. In the
   case of a ball striking a pin, this is the percentage of energy transfer from the ball to the pin.
Conventional Grip - The method of drilling in which the fingers are inserted to the second knuckle.
Core (aka: Weight Block)- The large, round inner portion of a three piece bowling ball. This area consists of the filler
   material and may have other high-density materials for dynamic purposes.
Core Torque - The mass distribution within the arms created by the core (or weight block). Core torque is an assigned
   value of the ball's ability to combat rollout, the complete los of axis tilt. High torque balls are more effective than
   lower torque bals at delaying "rollout". High torque balls will also tend to react more violently on the backend than
   lower torque balls, which roll more even, displaying a more predictable transition from skid to roll.
Coverstock - High rev rate...a player that prefers to play the swing shot, throwing the ball towards the gutter looking for
   a big, late backend reaction.
Crack- A partial break or split, slight or narrow, which appears on the surface of the ball. Also referred to as “stress
   fractures” which often occur around thumb or finger inserts or through the bridge area between the finger holes; a
   cracked bowling ball is not automatically disallowed from use in certified competition.
D-Scale - Refers to an instrument (Durometer) used to measure the hardness of the coverstock of a bowling ball.
Differential (of Radius of Gyration) - The difference of the radius of gyration of a bowling ball's X axis (the weight block
   vertical) compared to the radius of gyration of the same ball's Y or Z axis (the weight block horizontal). Differential is
   an indicator of a bowling ball's track flare potential. Bowling balls with lower differentials are more stable, therefore
   generating less track flare potential. Bowling balls with higher differentials are unstable, therefore generating a much
   larger track flare potential. Also, differential is a guide to the internal versatility of a ball. It can indicate just how much
   of a length adjustment can be made through drilling. Balls with lower differential will allow only modest length
   adjustments whereas balls with higher differential may translate into a length window of up to 5-times that of low
   differential balls.
Dull - The surface of a bowling ball appearing without reflection (synonym - Sanded)
Flare - The migration of the ball track from the bowler's initial axis (the axis upon release) to the final axis (the axis at
   the moment of impact with the pins). Flare is a length modifier. Flare is used to expose fresh, dry ball surface to the
   lane surface, the entire length of the lane. While on oil, this means little to the performance of the ball, but when the
   ball crosses from the oil to the dry, the dry ball surface bonds with the dry lane surface to increase friction which
   causes earlier hook and greater overall reaction.
Flare Potential - The maximum amount that the axis of a bowling ball can migrate given the construction of the ball
   provided that the bowler has a miximum power release. Flare potential can also be used to indicate which balls will
   be better suited for oily conditions (high flare balls) and which balls will be better suited for dryer lane condtions (low
   flare balls).
Friction - The energy released upon the bowling ball contacting the lane surface causing the transition from skid to roll.
Grit - Pertaining to the texture of the surface of the ball, whether polished or sanded.
Heads - The portion of the lane, which extends from the foul line, past the arrows, and to the pine. Usually, this is
   assumed to be the first 20 feet of the lane.
Hook Potential - Refers to the number of boards one ball will 'cover' relative to another.
Lane Oil/Conditioner - Substance that was developed to reduce friction between the ball and the lane, with the ultimate
   goal of protecting the lane surface. It also allows the ball to skid down to its desired roll and hook point, and its
   placement can greatly affect scores.
Length - An evaluation of how far a ball will travel before it begins to hook. Length does not include skid caused by
   laneconditioner, additional fine sanding, or the use of polishes.
Leverage Point - The position located 3 3/8" from the bowler's positive axis point (PAP). Positioning the mass (or pin) of
   a bowling ball on this point creates the most track flare and over all hook of a bowling ball.
Mass Bias - The position in a bowling ball, other than the pin, where the mass is closest to the outside circumference
   of a bowling ball. Mass Bias appears only in "pin out" balls. The offsetting of the weight block tilts the mass to one
   side creating a center of gravity away from the pin. There is now "Mass Biased" to one side of the ball.
Midlane - This is the middles part of the lane past the heads (1st 20 feet of the lane) and before the backends (last 20
   feet of the lane).
Midline - A horizontal line half way between the fingers and thumb.
Midplane - A line perpendicular to the midline that extends through the positive and negative axis points. This line
   divides the top and bottom halves of the ball on the bowler's axis of rotation.
Oil Patterns - The way oil is distributed onto the lane. Here are the most common used in bowling centers:
Top Hat - Heavy oil in the middle and very light on the outside
Christmas Tree - More oil in the middle than the outside. Tapered to the outside throughout the entire pattern
Sport - Permits ration of 3:1 oil from inside to outside portion of the lane. Used on PBA Tour.
Flat - Same amount of oil applied across the entire lane
Reverse Block - More oil applied to the outside boards than in the inside

Particle - Relates to coverstocks, particle technology consists of small units of various materials added to the shell. Particle coverstocks provide increased traction in the oil.
  Pin - A small factory plug that signifies the center of the weight block in most bowling balls.
  Pin In - Refers to the weight block being centered in the ball. When this occurs, the pin is within 1" from the cg.
  1. Pin and Center of Gravity (CG) are together on ball.
  2. The weight block is perfectly center in the ball. 

  Pin Out - Refers to the weight block not being centered in the ball. When this occurs, the pin will be more than 1" from the cg.
  1. Pin and CG are not together.
  2. The weight block is not perfectly centered in the ball.
  3. This offsetting of the weight block tilts mass to one side creating a center of gravity away from the pin.
  4. We now have "Mass Biased" to one side of the ball. 

Pines - Generally referred to as the middle 20 feet of the lanes. Actually, on wood lanes, it represents the 45 feet
  between the arrows and the head pin.
Positive Axis Point (PAP) - The point on the pocket side of the ball that is at the end of the bowler's axis of rotation
   upon delivery.
Preferred Spin Axis - The axis which a ball desires to rotate around, and which it flares to achieve this rotation.
Radius of Gyration (RG) - An account of the location of the mass inside a bowling ball. Rg tells us whether the ball has
   the mass toward the center of the ball (low rg), toward the cover of the ball (high rg) or somewhere in between
   (medium rg).
  1. Low rg balls rev up quickly.
  2. Medium rg balls rev up slightly later.
  3. High rg balls lope down the lane saving the energy until later. 

RAD - Radial Accelerating Dual Density Disk. When combined with a strong reactive or particle shell, this
   asymmetrical design produces a very aggressive ball path.
Reactive Urethane - A coverstock comprised of similar materials used in urethane formulations, however blended with
   different additives. This coverstock adheres to lane surface, creating the most backend reaction, the least deflection
   and the most hitting power of any coverstock manufactured today. * Revolutions - The number of times in which the
   weight block makes one full rotation around the axis line, as it rolls from the foul line to the head pin.
Rev Rate - A player's Rev Rate will relate to selection of differential, or Flare Potential, for that Particular Condition!
  *To Calculate a Player's Total Revolutions:
  1. Place a stripe of tape from the player's axis point to their ring finger.
  2. Count the revolutions between the player's release and the arrows.
  3. Multiply this number by four (4). 

  Slower Rev Rate = Stroker - up to 11 revolutions
  Medium Rev Rate = Tweener - from 11 to 17 revolutions
  Faster Rev Rate = Cranker - greater than 17 revolutions 

Scotch-Brite - This is an abrasive that is used to scuff or sand the ball surface to create different ball reactions or used
   to resurface the ball cover after the wear and tear from use. We recommend these three types of grits:
  1. Burgundy - this is the roughest and equates to 240-grit sandpaper.
  2. Green - this is the medium textured pad and it will produce a 500-600 grit finish.
  3. Gray - this is the smoothest and finest grit pad. Will adjust the surface to an 800 finish. 

Skid/Flip - Refers to a ball reaction that results in excessive backend reaction and increased entry angle.
Stroker - Slow rev rate...a player that will play the lanes 'down and in' covering very few boards.
Static Weights - (top, side and finger): Fine tunes ball reaction.
Surface - The composition of the outside of the bowling ball. Also refers to the texture of the coverstock of a bowling
   ball.
Three Piece Construction - A bowling ball constructed of three elements: the coverstock, the filler material, and the
   high-density puck.
Two Piece Construction - A bowling ball constructed of two elements: the coverstock and the weight block. A modified
   two piece bowling ball has the same basic characteristics of a two piece ball, only the weight block has been
   modified to change the dynamics of the ball (i.e. dual density weight block).
Tweener - Medium rev rate...a player that likes to belly the ball slightly, but prefers a fairly controllable reaction overall.
Urethane - A coverstock comprised of material from the polymer family which creates a hard, durable surface on the
   ball.
Weight Block - The inner portion of a two piece (or modified two piece) bowling ball which influences ball reaction
   based on its density and position to the bowlers axis.
THE LANE & BALL CONNECTION
Brief outline of a lengthy seminar
July 11, 2009
2009 Bowl Expo, Las Vegas, NV
Brunswick Bowling

A Players Guide to Ball Motion And Lane Play

HOW CAN YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS INFO?:
  * This is a high level outline of critical information needed by a pro shop operator and bowler
  * It is imperative that you educate yourself and your bowlers to be aware of all of the variables

FACTORS A BOWLER NEEDS TO CONNECT:









SURFACE CONSIDERATION:
  * Before you think about a pattern, it is important to understand the friction and wear characteristics of the playing
  surface

LANE SURFACES:
* Surface Type
* Topography
* Surface Wear
* Environmental Factors

SPECIAL RULE:
  * Never assume that all the lanes will play the same. Too many factors can cause the lanes to play differently from
  pair to pair and lane to lane. This is true from day to day as well.

OIL PATTERNS:
* Volume
* Length
* Hold
* Defined or Flat
* Transitions

VOLUME:
  * All patterns transition
  - Higher volumes should be stretched towards the headpin.
  - Lower volumes are easy to blow a hole into.

LENGTH:
  * A consideration for the lateral (left to right) location of the breakpoint can be determined by the length of the
  pattern
  - The shorter the pattern, the closer to the gutter you should play
  - The longer the pattern, the closer to the pocket you should play
  * Lengthwise Taper also has to be considered
  - Strong Taper = less carry down
  - Weaker Taper = more carry down

HOLD:
  * Most bowlers learn to bowl in an environment that provides hold. Hold is the ability to make mistakes inside of a
  bowlers target and still achieve desirable results.
  * Due to the physical nature of the human body, it is common to make mistakes inside a bowlers target.
  * Most patterns are designed to have more oil inside of a bowlers target line. This can be used as
  “hold” with the right match up.

DEFINED OR FLAT:
  * There are basically two types of patterns
  * “Defined Patterns” are patterns that give artificial guidance. If a bowler cannot find definition, they
  should opt to use Flat Pattern strategies. Knowing what Flat Patterns are, minimizes the challenges
  of oil migration and depletion.

TRANSITIONS:
  * Bowling has always been and always will be about transitions. No matter what pattern you bowl on
  there is always a common transition.
  * On every pattern, the first transition is oil going down the lane and the second transition is the fronts
  drying up.
  *The oil pushes down the lane where ever the field decides to move it. 
  * As the competition increase, it becomes very obvious that the friction in the front part of the lane
  increases.
  - Good bowlers in all eras of our sport understood this and adjust strategies accordingly
  * Take and pattern you want and imagine you are an artist with a paint brush. You have been given instruction to
  brush the oil in a way that the oil will make the scoring conditions easier.
  * Bowlers are artists
  * Bowling balls can be likened to a paint brush. The better bowlers are matching up their ball roll and understand
  how the effect of oil being brushed around affects their strategies.

PIN CARRY:
  * Huge consideration, most bowlers don’t understand.
  * The winner is usually determined by pin carry.
  * The part of the pocket and the ball motion shape is very important. The biggest mistake most bowlers make is
  trying to use too much entry angle. The flaw to this strategy is the limitations on the amount of the headpin that
  the bowler is allowed to use.
  * There is a balance between entry angle and the part of the pocket the bowler is attempting to use. The traditional
  strike uses more of the headpin than most bowlers understand. It is very difficult to use this part of the headpin
  when the entry angle is too great.
  * Observation skills are very important. A bowler is closest to being lined up when they leave a 4 pin than they are
  when they leave a 10 pin.

SCORING PACE:
  * Lively kickbacks, sidewalls, pins, patterns, all affect scoring pace. Choosing the right ball affects scoring pace.
  * Knowledge and experience can raise the scoring pace. A good bowler will adjust their strategies from experience.

FIELD AND FORMAT:
  * There is a wide variety of formats used in the sport. 
  - League, 3 games, same pair
  - PBA, 9 game blocks, crossing pairs

THE BOWLER:
  * There are 4 things we need to know about the bowler
- Ball Speed
- Rev Rate
- Axis Tilt
- Axis Rotation

THE 5 TYPES OF BOWLERS:
1- Rev rate strongly dominates ball speed
(RONNIE RUBBERWRISTER)
2- Rev rate slightly dominates ball speed
(AVERAGE PBA PLAYER)
3- Ball Speed and rev rate match

4- Ball speed slightly dominates rev rate
(AVERAGE LEAGUE BOWLER)
5- Ball speed strongly dominates rev rate
(PERCY PUSSKNUCKLER)

THE BOWLING BALL:
  * Need to know all of the previous info to even start to make a decision on a bowling ball.
  * Need to consider the following in choosing the right ball.
  - Overall hook potential of ball
  - Shape you are trying to create
- RG of Core
- Strength of Coverstock
- Sanded or Shiny
- Strong Layout or Weak Layout

Understanding Bowling Ball Motion
Choosing a Bowling Ball That's Right for Your Arsenal
Understanding You as a Bowler
Bowling Ball P.A.P.
How to Choose a Bowling Ball to Fit
Your Needs - USBC Bowling Academy
Cracked Bowling Ball: Climate Effects
USBC Bowling Academy
Bowl Better With Brunswick
Choosing Your First Bowling Ball
Shop & Pre-Order in the Online Store